Click Here!Click Here!
Home / U.S / How do we spell TIE? National Spelling Bee has dual winners
How do we spell TIE? National Spelling Bee has dual winners

How do we spell TIE? National Spelling Bee has dual winners


.cnn_html_media_utility::before{color:red;content:’>>’;font-size:9px;line-height:12px;padding-right:1px}
.cnnstrylccimg640{margin:0 27px 14px 0}
.captionText{filter:alpha(opacity=100);opacity:1}
.cnn_html_slideshow_media_caption a,.cnn_html_slideshow_media_caption a:visited,.cnn_html_slideshow_media_caption a:link,.captionText a,.captionText a:visited,.captiontext a:link{color:outline:medium none}
.cnnVerticalGalleryPhoto{margin:0 auto;padding-right:68px;width:270px}
]]>

Confetti falls after Ansun Sujoe, left, of Fort Worth, Texas, and Sriram Hathwar of Painted Post, New York, both won a 2014 Scripps National Spelling Bee foe on Thursday, May 29, in National Harbor, Maryland. Hathwar and Sujoe were announced as co-champions after 22 rounds of a competition. Sujoe spelled a word feuilleton and Hathwar spelled a word stichomythia. They both spelled their difference rightly as they tired a difference on a bee's list. They were a initial co-champions given 1962. More than 250 students from a United States and 7 other countries collected to foe in a annual contest.Confetti falls after Ansun Sujoe, left, of Fort Worth, Texas, and Sriram Hathwar of Painted Post, New York, both won a 2014 Scripps National Spelling Bee foe on Thursday, May 29, in National Harbor, Maryland. Hathwar and Sujoe were announced as co-champions after 22 rounds of a competition. Sujoe spelled a word “feuilleton” and Hathwar spelled a word “stichomythia.” They both spelled their difference rightly as they tired a difference on a bee’s list. They were a initial co-champions given 1962. More than 250 students from a United States and 7 other countries collected to foe in a annual contest.

Hathwar, right, looks on as Sujoe rightly spells feuilleton, creation them both this years champions. Hathwar, right, looks on as Sujoe rightly spells “feuilleton,” creation them both this years champions.

Jacob Daniel Williamson, of Cape Coral, Florida, reacts after rightly spelling a word Thursday, May 29, during a Scripps National Spelling Bee in Oxon Hill, Maryland. Jacob Daniel Williamson, of Cape Coral, Florida, reacts after rightly spelling a word Thursday, May 29, during a Scripps National Spelling Bee in Oxon Hill, Maryland.

Tejas Muthusamy, of Glen Allen, Virginia, reacts after he rightly spelled a word on May 29. Tejas Muthusamy, of Glen Allen, Virginia, reacts after he rightly spelled a word on May 29.

Kate Miller, of Abilene, Texas, reacts after training she spelled a word brachypterous rightly on May 29.Kate Miller, of Abilene, Texas, reacts after training she spelled a word “brachypterous” rightly on May 29.

Jae Canetti, of Fairfax, Virginia, cringes after wrongly spelling a word on May 29. Jae Canetti, of Fairfax, Virginia, cringes after wrongly spelling a word on May 29.

Timothy Lau, of Torrance, California, reacts after rightly spelling a word on May 29. Timothy Lau, of Torrance, California, reacts after rightly spelling a word on May 29.

Paul Keaton, of Pikeville, Kentucky, competes on May 29.Paul Keaton, of Pikeville, Kentucky, competes on May 29.

Shayley Grace Martin, of Riner, Virginia, reacts after she rightly spelled a word on May 29.Shayley Grace Martin, of Riner, Virginia, reacts after she rightly spelled a word on May 29.

Ethan S. Perrins, of Lawrence, Kansas, closes his eyes while spelling a word on Wednesday, May 28.Ethan S. Perrins, of Lawrence, Kansas, closes his eyes while spelling a word on Wednesday, May 28.

Naama Friedman, of Knoxville, Tennessee, participates in a spelling bee on May 28.Naama Friedman, of Knoxville, Tennessee, participates in a spelling bee on May 28.

From left, Dylan O'Connor, of Alexandria Bay, New York; Tajaun Gibbison, of Mandeville, Jamaica; Tea Freedman-Susskind, of Redmond, Washington; and Ankita Vadiala, of Manassas, Virginia, applaud May 28 after subordinate for a semifinal round. From left, Dylan O’Connor, of Alexandria Bay, New York; Tajaun Gibbison, of Mandeville, Jamaica; Tea Freedman-Susskind, of Redmond, Washington; and Ankita Vadiala, of Manassas, Virginia, applaud May 28 after subordinate for a semifinal round.

Alexandra Harper, of Guayama, Puerto Rico, concentrates before spelling a word bildungsroman on May 28. Alexandra Harper, of Guayama, Puerto Rico, concentrates before spelling a word “bildungsroman” on May 28.

Jessie Skylar Williams, of Traverse City, Michigan, reacts after misspelling a word on May 28.Jessie Skylar Williams, of Traverse City, Michigan, reacts after misspelling a word on May 28.

Joel Miles, of Raymore, Mississippi, pumps his fist after rightly spelling a word sporran on May 28.Joel Miles, of Raymore, Mississippi, pumps his fist after rightly spelling a word “sporran” on May 28.

Kasey Cuenca Torres, of San Angelo, Texas, shows service after spelling a word rightly on May 28.Kasey Cuenca Torres, of San Angelo, Texas, shows service after spelling a word rightly on May 28.

Ed Horan, of Hoboken, New Jersey, rightly spells a word fantoccini on May 28.Ed Horan, of Hoboken, New Jersey, rightly spells a word “fantoccini” on May 28.

Isabelle Marie Simmons, of Annapolis, Maryland, reacts after misspelling a word on May 28.Isabelle Marie Simmons, of Annapolis, Maryland, reacts after misspelling a word on May 28.

Anika Patel, of Gilberts, Illinois, reacts after rightly spelling a word luxuriate on May 28.Anika Patel, of Gilberts, Illinois, reacts after rightly spelling a word “luxuriate” on May 28.

Amber Robinson, of Homestead, Florida, concentrates before wrongly spelling a word pelagial on May 28.Amber Robinson, of Homestead, Florida, concentrates before wrongly spelling a word “pelagial” on May 28.

Zander Reed, of Ames, Iowa, closes his eyes and spells a word hill on May 28.Zander Reed, of Ames, Iowa, closes his eyes and spells a word “precipice” on May 28.

Seongjun Lee, of Seoul, South Korea, concentrates before blank a word apparatchik on May 28.Seongjun Lee, of Seoul, South Korea, concentrates before blank a word “apparatchik” on May 28.

Sean Hickey, of Grass Lake, Michigan, participates in a foe on May 28.Sean Hickey, of Grass Lake, Michigan, participates in a foe on May 28.


1


2


3


4


5


6


7


8


9


10


11


12


13


14


15


16


17


18


19


20


21


22


23

(CNN) — Sriram Hathwar and Ansun Sujoe rightly spelled so many difference Thursday that a Scripps National Spelling Bee had to announce them both winners.

Why? Because there weren’t adequate difference left on a competition’s list for them to keep confronting off until usually one was left standing.

In a bee’s final round, Hathwar, a 14-year-old eighth-grader from Painted Post, New York, rightly spelled a word “stichomythia” — discourse generally of rumpus delivered by dual actors.

Sujoe, a 13-year-old seventh-grader from Fort Worth, Texas, rightly spelled a word “feuilleton” — partial of a European newspaper.

Ansun Sujoe, left, and Sriram Hathwar became co-champions of a 2014 Scripps National Spelling Bee foe Sujoe spelled a word feuilleton and Hathwar spelled a word stichomythia. They both spelled their difference rightly as they tired a difference on a bee's list, apropos a initial co-champions given 1962. Ansun Sujoe, left, and Sriram Hathwar became co-champions of a 2014 Scripps National Spelling Bee foe Sujoe spelled a word “feuilleton” and Hathwar spelled a word “stichomythia.” They both spelled their difference rightly as they tired a difference on a bee’s list, apropos a initial co-champions given 1962.

Arvind Mahankali won a 2013 Scripps National Spelling Bee after spelling knaidel, that is a dumpling. Click by to see a rest of a winners from a past 15 years. The definitions of their winning difference are from a Merriam-Webster dictionary.Arvind Mahankali won a 2013 Scripps National Spelling Bee after spelling “knaidel,” that is a dumpling. Click by to see a rest of a winners from a past 15 years. The definitions of their winning difference are from a Merriam-Webster dictionary.

Snigdha Nandipati won in 2012 with a word guetapens, that means an ambush.Snigdha Nandipati won in 2012 with a word “guetapens,” that means an ambush.

Sukanya Roy won in 2011 with a word cymotrichous, an verb that means carrying a hair wavy. Sukanya Roy won in 2011 with a word “cymotrichous,” an verb that means “having a hair wavy.”

Anamika Veeramani won in 2010 with a word stromuhr, that is an instrument that measures a volume and speed of blood upsurge by an artery. Anamika Veeramani won in 2010 with a word “stromuhr,” that is an instrument that measures a volume and speed of blood upsurge by an artery.

Kavya Shivashankar won in 2009 when she rightly spelled laodicean, that means lukewarm or indifferent, quite in matters of politics or religion.Kavya Shivashankar won in 2009 when she rightly spelled “laodicean,” that means lukewarm or indifferent, quite in matters of politics or religion.

Sameer Mishra won in 2008 with a word guerdon, that is a prerogative or recompense. Sameer Mishra won in 2008 with a word “guerdon,” that is a prerogative or recompense.

Evan O'Dorney won in 2007 with a word serrefine, tiny forceps used for clamping a blood vessel.Evan O’Dorney won in 2007 with a word “serrefine,” tiny forceps used for clamping a blood vessel.

Katharine Close won in 2006 by rightly spelling ursprache, a denunciation that is reconstructed from justification of after languages. Katharine Close won in 2006 by rightly spelling “ursprache,” a denunciation that is reconstructed from justification of after languages.

Anurag Kashyap won in 2005 with a word appoggiatura, a smaller embellishing note or tinge that precedes a symphonic note or tone.Anurag Kashyap won in 2005 with a word “appoggiatura,” a smaller embellishing note or tinge that precedes a symphonic note or tone.

David Tidmarsh won in 2004 with a word autochthonous, an verb that means inland or native.David Tidmarsh won in 2004 with a word “autochthonous,” an verb that means inland or native.

Sai R. Gunturi won in 2003 with a word pococurante, definition indifferent or nonchalant.Sai R. Gunturi won in 2003 with a word “pococurante,” definition indifferent or nonchalant.

Pratyush Buddiga won in 2002 with a word prospicience, that is a act of looking brazen or carrying foresight. Pratyush Buddiga won in 2002 with a word “prospicience,” that is a act of looking brazen or carrying foresight.

Sean Conley won in 2001 with succedaneum, tangible as a substitute. Sean Conley won in 2001 with “succedaneum,” tangible as “a substitute.”

George Abraham Thampy won in 2000 with a French word dmarche, definition a march of action, typically in politics. George Abraham Thampy won in 2000 with a French word “démarche,” definition a march of action, typically in politics.

Nupur Lala won in 1999 with a word logorrhea, definition extreme and disjointed loquacity or wordiness. Nupur Lala won in 1999 with a word “logorrhea,” definition extreme and disjointed loquacity or wordiness.

Jody-Anne Maxwell won in 1998 after rightly spelling chiaroscurist, that is an artist who specializes in chiaroscuro, or resisting a effects of light and shade in a work of art.Jody-Anne Maxwell won in 1998 after rightly spelling “chiaroscurist,” that is an artist who specializes in chiaroscuro, or resisting a effects of light and shade in a work of art.


1


2


3


4


5


6


7


8


9


10


11


12


13


14


15


16


17

National Spelling Bee championsNational Spelling Bee champions


This year’s spelling bee champ is ….


Spelling bee runs out of … words?

It’s a initial time a bee has finished in a tie in some-more than 50 years. The final time there were co-champions was in 1962, organizers said. Ties also finished a bees in 1950 and 1957.

“I consider we both know that a foe was opposite a dictionary, not opposite any other,” Hathwar pronounced on ESPN after a win. “I am happy to share this prize with him.”

The dual fast garnered regard from high office. President Obama tweeted his kudos: “Congrats to Ansun and Sriram, a implausible co-champs of a #ScrippsNationalSpellingBee. You make us all proud! -bo”

In this year’s inhabitant championship, 281 spellers from 8 countries competed for a title. The foe started Tuesday and finished adult Thursday night with a finals promote live on ESPN.

Sujoe told ESPN that he got bending on a bee by examination it on television. In further to spelling, he has ideal representation and plays piano, bassoon and guitar.

“I was flattering happy when we done a finals, and now I’m even happier that I’m a co-champion,” Sujoe said.

Hathwar, who placed third in final year’s foe and initial done it to a National Spelling Bee as a second-grader in 2008, was a favorite to win this year’s contest.

The youngest aspirant this year was 8 years old. And a oldest was 15 years old, organizers said.

Even students who didn’t travel divided with a prize seemed vehement about their subsequent steps.

Tejas Muthusamy, 11, pronounced he’d lapse home prepared to change his investigate slight for destiny competitions.

“Now I’ll ready some-more for a finals, and try to go by some-more enigmatic words,” Muthusamy said, mins after misspelling “hallenkirche” got him kicked out of a competition.

Eighth grader Kate Miller, who struck out in a finals when she misspelled a universe “exochorion,” pronounced there’s a lot she’ll be bringing behind to Abilene, Texas.

“I will take home with me a container full of happy memories, good friends and a loyal feeling of acceptance,” she told ESPN.

And she didn’t demur when asked what her subsequent pierce would be.

“I don’t need to investigate spelling anymore, and we don’t unequivocally need to nap anymore,” she said. “So I’m going to go home and watch each fear film on that we can get my hands.”

READ: The anguish and enjoyment of a National Spelling Bee

READ: National foe isn’t bee-all and end-all



About admin

Scroll To Top