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Freddie Gray jurors deadlocked, decider says keep deliberating

Freddie Gray jurors deadlocked, decider says keep deliberating

By
JULIET LINDERMAN and DAVID DISHNEAU
Associated Press

BALTIMORE (AP) – Jurors pronounced they were unresolved Tuesday as they weighed killing and other charges opposite a military officer in a genocide of Freddie Gray. The decider told them to keep deliberating and they went home for a night yet reaching a verdict.

The jury reported a problem in a note to Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams after about 9 hours of discussions over dual days. It wasn’t transparent if they were stranded on one or some-more of a 4 charges Officer William Porter faces. He is a initial of 6 officers to mount trial.

Armored vehicles and military were stationed around a city, and officials betrothed they were prepared for any unrest. Parts of a city burnt final open after Gray’s genocide triggered disappointment over a department’s purported indignity of black people, and authorities were dynamic to forestall a repeat.

Earlier Tuesday, jurors requested highlighters, an easel and gummy notes, suggesting a professional proceed to assessing Porter’s purpose in Gray’s detain and death. They also perceived mechanism speakers to urge a sound peculiarity of recordings in evidence, including Porter’s videotaped speak with Baltimore military detectives, military radio transmissions on a day Gray was arrested and cellphone videos done during dual of a wagon’s 6 stops.

In all, a jury listened from 28 witnesses and perceived about 100 pieces of justification in a trial, that began Nov. 30. They even took a outing to see a military car where Gray had been placed face-first on a floor, with his wrists cuffed behind his behind and his ankles shackled.

If a jury stays deadlocked, a mistrial would be announced and prosecutors would have to confirm either to put Porter on hearing again.

Gray, who was arrested while tour from police, died Apr 19, a week after his neck was damaged while a seven-block outing incited into a circuitous, 45-minute tour around West Baltimore. The autopsy resolved that Gray substantially suffered a damage from being slammed opposite a compartment’s steel wall during cornering or braking.

The charges lift limit jail terms totaling 25 years, yet philosophy on some of a obtuse charges could be joined for sentencing purposes.

The decider denied renewed invulnerability requests to announce a mistrial or try Porter outward of Baltimore. Porter’s lawyers also sought in vain to ask jurors if they’d seen a minute a city schools arch sent home with children Monday, warning opposite aroused responses to a verdict.

The decider pronounced seeking jurors about a minute would not be appropriate. The jury has not been sequestered, yet they have been warned not to review news articles about a box or speak about it with anyone other than associate jurors.

Prosecutors resolved that Porter could have saved Gray’s life with dual clicks: one to bend him in with a chair belt and another to serve medical assistance with his military radio. Instead, they pronounced Porter’s insusceptibility creates him criminally obliged for Gray’s injury.

The invulnerability characterized Porter as a obliged officer who told supervisors to take Gray to a hospital, even yet he testified that a detainee showed no signs of pain or trouble before he arrived during a military hire critically injured.

Prosecutors pronounced this was a blatant lie.

“Freddie Gray went into a outpost healthy and he came out of a outpost dead,” prosecutor Janice Bledsoe pronounced in her shutting argument. The ride outpost “became his box on wheels.”

Bledsoe showed jurors a cleared chair belt: “It’s got Gray’s blood on it,” she said.

“Don’t tumble for that,” invulnerability profession Joseph Murtha countered. Expert witnesses disagreed on accurately when Gray’s neck was damaged during his trip, and this alone should give jurors reasonable doubt, he said.

Gray’s genocide was indeed a “horrific tragedy,” he said, yet “there is literally no evidence” Porter is responsible.

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This element might not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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